Aussie Researchers Implementing New Lithium-Sulphur Battery

A new version of lithium-sulphur power that can run utility vehicles is being created at the Baosteel-Australia Joint Investigate and Development Middle based at The School of Queensland (UQ). Using imaginative technology, researchers at the Centre aim to produce a grp composite of sulphur (an electrical insulator), along with carbon (a conductor) along with excellent […]

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A new version of lithium-sulphur power that can run utility vehicles is being created at the Baosteel-Australia Joint Investigate and Development Middle based at The School of Queensland (UQ).

Using imaginative technology, researchers at the Centre aim to produce a grp composite of sulphur (an electrical insulator), along with carbon (a conductor) along with excellent stability and content to improve high-energy lithium-sulphur electric batteries.

UQ-based Project Leader Instructor Ian Gentle said the science had the potential to provide the high-energy density hard drive needed to increase the number of electric vehicles to several hundred kilometres, which would help overcome one of the leading barriers to the endorsement of this technology.

While lithium-ion energy are widely used inside small electronic equipment, they can’t supply the capacity needed for serious energy users which include cars, which is at least three times greater than that will currently available, he said.

The extensive use of zero-emission vehicles, when teamed with environmentally friendly energy sources, is an important part of the environmentally-friendly energy strategy, as well as Baosteel is partnering by using UQ to develop advanced resources and technologies that should contribute towards that goal.

Other potential applications of the research include back-up power for wind and solar electric power plants, and crisis power for problem areas.

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